Do You Have Winter Allergies?

Holiday Allergies If you thought the winter season was a…

Holiday Allergies

If you thought the winter season was a relief from allergies, you might want to think again… Is it possible to get winter allergies? Yup!

The holidays bring many things: time with friends and family, goodwill and, unfortunately, winter allergies in unexpected places. Winter allergy symptoms could include sneezy or runny nose, itchy eyes, nose or throat, watery eyes, dry scaly skin or redness. Lucky for you, we’ve outlined some of the triggers to look out for to reduce your exposure to winter allergies and make for a much cheerier holiday.

 

1. Poinsettias.

Did you know poinsettias are a member of the rubber tree family? These plants contain compounds similar to those found in latex, so they may cause an allergic reaction in someone that has a latex allergy. If you or a family member has a latex allergy, the best course of action when it comes to poinsettias is to not have them in your house or workplace at all.

2. Christmas trees

While some people are allergic to pine trees, there is a more common allergen that could be sneaking into your home, hidden on the branches of your live Christmas tree: mold. Christmas trees that are cut ahead of time may have been stored in a humid environment, allowing mold spores to form, and those spores can continue to increase in your home. (Pollen that has been stuck to the tree may also be released once inside your home.) To avoid these symptoms, wear gloves and long sleeves to prevent allergens from coming into contact with your skin. If possible, spray the tree down with a hose and let it dry before bringing it into the house. Or, if you sense you do have an allergy to mold, maybe go for a fake tree this year?

3 . Chestnuts

Some allergy sufferers might want to think twice before building a fire to roast chestnuts over. And it’s not just because of nut allergies! Firewood can contain mold spores and wood burned in a fireplace can release airborne irritants and pollutants, which may cause asthma symptoms or allergic rhinitis.

4. Drinks.

Did you experience flushed skin, hives, or nasal congestion after you consumed alcohol at the holiday party? Or did you experience sickness after just one or two drinks? You might have an alcohol intolerance. Click here to learn more about alcohol intolerance triggers and the related allergens that cause reactions.

Wishing you a happy, healthy, allergy-free holiday from all of here at Hudson Allergy!

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